Nothing More Tackle Disturbing Trend Of Mass Shootings In “Let ‘Em Burn” Video

Nothing More premiere a new music video for their song “Let ‘Em Burn” taken from their latest effort, “The Stories We Tell Ourselves“. The video takes on the disturbing trend of mass shootings in the U.S..

Comments Nothing More:

“Hundreds of people have been killed in mass shootings over the past several years. Almost everyone has chosen the red team or the blue team and we’re stuck in this mode where we fight over political problems instead of human solutions.

More guns or less guns isn’t the question. The real question is, why are we killing each other?”

Adds the band’s frontman Johnny Hawkins:

“The ‘villain and victim’ narrative in media is so seared into our brains that we can’t see straight. The media has become our God and we have become its bitch.

We are blind to human solutions because our emotions have been glued to political problems, and it has paralyzed our progress.

Most of us know that mental health is the cause of mass shootings, yet we are obsessed with talking about the symptoms and gridlocking ourselves in political battles without proper action.

It’s time to find solutions… it’s time to focus on mental health.”

Post to Twitter

Karl Schubach Breaks His Silence On Being Fired From Misery Signals

With Misery Signals‘ 2008 release having recently hit its tenth anniversary, the group’s ex-vocalist Karl Schubach breaks his silence on his 2014 firing from the band to make way for the return of his predecessor frontman Jesse Zaraska:

“This year marked the 10th anniversary of what, by definition, should have been one of the greatest accomplishments of my life. Misery Signals third studio album, Controller, was released July 22, 2008. I still receive floods of messages from fans explaining how much that album means to them.

To this day, I’ve maintained my silence in regards to my departure from the band which, in retrospect, might be part of the reason I find myself struggling with my mental health to this day.

Over the past few years, I’ve felt growing resentment, and increasing negativity towards my experience as a member of Misery Signals. Removal from the band has left me fighting increasing battles with depression, anxiety, and a complete loss of self-confidence that has severely affected my personal relationships, and has hindered the way I interact with people.

In order to grow, move forward, and begin the healing process I feel there’s no better time than this 10 year milestone to shed some light:

I received a phone call from Ryan in early October, 2015. It was only a week or so after I had made the drive two hours north to link up with Kyle and Stu at a Comeback Kid show in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. It had been a while since I had any communication with the guys, as no touring plans were in the immediate future.

After the formalities and courteous catching up on life, Ryan’s tone shifted. I already knew what was coming, I could feel it in his voice. He proceeded to inform me that the band collectively had decided to continue on with the original vocalist Jesse, which whom they had re-established their relationship with through performing together on the Malice X tour a few years prior.

Pause here.

For those who don’t know how I came to join the band, I submitted an audition via Myspace of myself singing over an instrumental track off their first record. At that point, they asked me to come down to Madison, WI in order to do an in-person audition, and to pack like I wouldn’t be coming home for a while. After a week of auditions and rehearsals, it was official: This random kid from Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada became the vocalist of his favorite band.

Everything was great in the honeymoon phase. Being on tour, in a different city every night, playing music to hundreds of people, sharing a stage with my idols…every….single….night. I was in no position to call any shots, nor did I want to. I was the new kid, and a literal stranger thrown into a world that was completely unknown to me. These guys had been touring together for years. They clearly had everything figured out. I was content in just being along for the wild ride.

Communication had never been the band’s strong suit. Although tempers never flared, feelings were rarely expressed. It felt like we would rather just bite our tongues, rather than butt heads in an effort to avoid confrontation. Quite simply, it was easier this way. I was guilty of it just the same.

Towards the end of an Australian tour, Stu and Kyle both announced their intentions to leave the band upon our return home. I remember Ryan and I having a conversation about the future of the band, and how he thought it should play out. Eventually he ended up recruiting Greg Thomas, who we had met while he was filling in on guitar for Shai Hulud. With Greg in the mix, it came time to start the writing process for what would become Absent Light.

Something changed in me during the writing of Absent Light. I felt like every decision was being made without my consideration. As if my opinion didn’t count for anything. Seven years, hundreds of shows, thousands of miles, and here I was still feeling like the new kid as I perceived to watch Greg waltz in and immediately get to start calling the shots alongside Ryan as to how things should sound, the recording process, the mix, etc.

That was the first time I could pinpoint that something wasn’t right. I found my mind constantly taking me to a dark place where I only had the ability to feel like a victim, and like everyone was out to get me. Every set of thoughts was illogical, and irrational.

Nothing made sense, but I still tried to justify my sporadic thought patterns. Rather than seek help, or make anyone aware, I shut down. I became distant, passive, and secluded. I had trouble sleeping, and staying focused. All motivation, creativity and passion seemed to vanish. I felt numb…..empty.

I contributed almost nothing to the lyrical content of Absent Light, as I simply couldn’t find the inspiration anymore. That same inspiration, which at one point flourished, had simply evaporated. I removed myself from the recording process of Absent Light and returned home to Regina, where I tracked the vocals in my home studio to the lyrics and vocal patterns that Ryan provided.

The album released a few months later, and a very light touring schedule was set up to support it. The runs were much shorter than what we were typically used to, but that didn’t seem to change anything. I was miserable on the road, completely disengaged from everyone.

I was content in being in a bubble 23 hours of the day, playing the show, and then returning to isolation. This wasn’t a healthy existence for me, or for the rest of the band members. I knew it. They knew it.

Resume Playback

Flash forward to a day after that phone call: I was angry. I felt used, discarded like a piece of trash tossed to the roadside out of a moving vehicle. “How dare they?!” For them to simply tell me my services were no longer required after essentially putting “real life” on hold, and investing 9 years into helping them to continue living out their dream.

No severance package, no two weeks notice, just simply: “welp…See ya later”. It’s taken a lot of time and self-reflection to realize their decision to remove me from the equation wasn’t out of malice (bad reference, I know), but as a necessity for both parties to be able to continue a healthy existence.

Up until recently, I hadn’t listened to a Misery Signals song since that phone call. The countless framed tour posters, magazine articles, vinyls had been collecting dust in a dark corner of my basement for years, rather than being out on display. It pained me to look at them, because I collectively associated them with the result of that conversation, and not the incredible memories and friendships that each of them represented.

In an attempt to heal, I’m letting go of the resentment. I’m taking ownership of the role I played, and the end result. I’m dusting off those posters, and hanging them on the wall, as I feel like I can finally show how proud I am of what I accomplished in that time.

To Ryan, Branden, Kyle, Stu & Greg: I haven’t had the opportunity to tell you I’m sorry. I’m not proud of what I let myself become, and ask that you forgive me for not having the strength to get the help I needed back then. Part of me wishes things could have been different, but most of me also thanks you for doing the right thing. I wish you nothing but the best of luck with Jesse and the new album. I’ll be one of the first to pre-order it.

To everyone else: I hope that by reading this, I haven’t let any of you down. If any of you are struggling with depression or anxiety, please make getting help a priority. Don’t let it go untreated. If you feel alone or like you have no one to talk to, please message me. I’d be happy to help in any way I can.

Writing this all out has actually been very therapeutic. To the point where I now feel the need to rephrase the very first sentence I wrote:

‘This year marks the 10th anniversary of what, by definition, is one of the greatest accomplishments of my life.’”

Post to Twitter

Chefs Chis Santos and Brian Tsao announce second annual “Small Bites Of Hope” fundraiser for mental health education and suicide prevention

– April 24th, 2018 –

Chef Brian Tsao, known for his appearances on Food Network’s Beat Bobby Flay and CHOPPED shows, as well as his high-energy, heavy metal chef persona on Metal Injection’s Taste of Metal web series, is pleased to announce Small Bites Of Hope, a fundraiser event on May 9 at VANDAL, the restaurant from Executive Chef and Food Network star Chef Chris Santos.

The event will be a fundraiser for the non-profit Hope For The Day, a Chicago-based charity whose mission is to achieve proactive suicide prevention through mental health education and outreach. Tsao supported the cause in 2017 with the inaugural Small Bites Of Hope held in New York’s Hit Factory Studio on May 18.

This year’s Small Bites Of Hope fundraiser features returning host Jesse Leach of Killswitch Engage, who had this to say about the event: “I’m honored to be a part of Small Bites Of Hope once again. Raising awareness and keeping the topic of mental health on the forefront of our community is crucial. It helps people realize they are not alone in this struggle.”

Tsao is teaming up with Santos to deliver their staple menu of street food and small-bite hors d’oeuvres and signature cocktails. Santos added, “It’s been a pleasure to have Chef Brian Tsao not only a part of our family at Beauty & Essex but also in the music industry! We’re excited to host this fundraiser and to bring attention to the help that is needed for all of those affected by mental health issues. I’m excited to join Chef Brian Tsao on shedding light on this cause.”

Sponsors of the 2018 Small Bites Of Hope event are Metal Blade Records, Black Light Media, Revolver, Jackson Guitars, Dark Matter Coffee, and Nightowl Studios.

Tickets will be sold online here, with 100% of the proceeds benefitting mental health education and proactive suicide prevention programs around the world.

About Hope For The Day:
Hope For The Day’s mission is to achieve proactive suicide prevention through outreach and mental health education. Hope For The Day is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based out of Chicago, IL. For more information go to hftd.org

About Nightowl Studios:
Nightowl Studios is a production company and creative studio based out of Los Angeles, specializing in advertising for comic books, video games, TV/Film and more.

About TAO Group:
The TAO group are a leading restaurant and nightlife company that develops, owns and operates many of the most successful food, beverage, and nightlife entertainment venues in the United States.

Tweet

Post to Twitter

New Study Finds What We All Already Knew Well Before: “Metal Is Good For Your Mental Health”

In the Journal of Community Psychology, Australian psychologists say that metal has a positive influence on young people aged 18-24. Researchers say metal helps protect fans from stress and bullies:

“Metal identities are popularly represented as leading to mental health issues but with flawed evidence. We documented the community contexts around metal and well-being by talking to young metalheads directly. We engaged in repeated, informal talks with 28 young Australians who strongly identified with metal (aged 18–24 years, 5 females and 23 males), and found that the metal identities and community protected them from mental health problems. Four core themes were found from transcripts: they were all bullied or marginalized through social relationships at school; they enjoyed the impact of metal music and lyrics when angry or ostracized; they felt part of a protective community of metalheads, even though in many cases at this age it was more imagined than real; and embodying metal identities enabled them to keep bullies, detractors, and others at bay, and to find friend groups. By talking repeatedly, directly with young metalheads, it was found that metal identities were helping participants to survive the stress of challenging environments and build strong and sustained identities and communities, thus alleviating any potential mental health issues.”

Read the whole study HERE.

Post to Twitter

Jesse Leach Teams Up With Chef Brian Tsao For “Small Bites Of Hope”

Chef Brian Tsao, known for his stint on Food Network’s Beat Bobby Flay and Chopped, as well as his heavy metal persona on the web series Taste of Metal, is hosting Small Bites Of Hope: a pop-up culinary event benefiting the non-profit organization Hope For The Day.

To celebrate Mental Health Awareness month in May, Tsao will team up Killswitch Engage frontman Jesse Leach to host a unique event that raises awareness for mental health advocacy and suicide prevention.

The event will offer exquisite catering from Tsao, signature cocktails from Bcraft, craft beer from Six Point Brewer, dessert from Snow Days, and more. Proceeds will benefit Hope for the Day, a non-profit organization that achieves proactive suicide prevention by providing outreach and mental health education through self-expression platforms.

The event takes place Thursday, May 18th from 6PM to 9PM at the Gibson Guitars Showroom, in the historic Hit Factory Studios on 251 West 54th Street, New York, New York 10019.

Tsao comments: “For too long, mental health has been ignored in the professional kitchens. With Small Bites of Hope, I want to present people in these harsh working environments with the opportunity to get help or give help to others that may need it. It only takes one to start the conversation that can resonate and help many others and this is that first major step for myself along with my friends in Hope for the Day and Jesse Leach!”

Leach, a known advocate for mental health, said, “I’m honored to be a part of Small Bites of Hope, to help raise awareness for mental health and suicide prevention with my pal Chef Brian Tsao! It is a subject near and dear to me, so having a dialogue and helping shine some light on a topic that is not talked about enough is important.”

Post to Twitter

Synaptik Posts New Lyric Video For “White Circles”

U.K. prog metal quintet SynaptiK unleashed their sophomore studio album, “Justify & Reason,” on March 10th through Defox Records (digitally), and via Divebomb Records in the U.S. in CD format. Today, April 10th, the album lands in various U.K. stores trhough Plastichead.

Today SynaptiK has also launched a lyric video for third single “White Circles.” Singer John Knight commented about the lyrical concept behind the song:

“Lyrically, the song describes the story of one person’s dependency on medication, antipsychotic drugs, the decision whether to stop taking them and return to a natural state risking confusion and illness or to continue on, the side effects, the withdrawals, the risks. All overseen by the ‘God like’ psychiatrist.”

Knight worked for many years within the mental health system at management level further comments, “I spoke at length with a client about her feelings towards her medication and her psychiatrist. She told me her psychiatrist was ‘like a God,’ someone who oversaw all the choices she made and controlled her life. It made an impression and I wrote this song that night. Of course, not every story is the same and medication plays a very important and useful part of people’s life, it’s not an anti-medication song at all, but about the conflict a person has, the internal battle… Telling themselves ‘I’m well now, I don’t need these tablets’ without realizing they feel this way because the medication is working, the side effects both being on and withdrawing can be severe.”

Post to Twitter

Vesen Premieres Pre-Release Full-Album Stream Of Upcoming New Album “Rorschach”

Norwegian blackened thrashers Vesen premiere the pre-release full-album stream of the band’s upcoming new album “Rorschach”, which will arrive in stores December 16th, via Soulseller Records.

Check out now “Rorschach” in its entirety below.

Says the label of it:

“Quite uncommon for the genre, the successor of 2012’s ‘This Time It’s Personal’ is a concept album and though it may sound progressive, the music is actually more regressive in a sense. But of course Vesen explore new ideas and grounds as well and head onwards in all directions at the same time, creating a unique and matured blend. ‘Rorschach’ is a concept album, certainly lyrically, less so musically. It started out as a concept spanning four albums, but through the process of working with it we found that it fit better on a single album. Overall, it deals with themes quite common in the Vesen universe, which is mental problems. Hence the name of the album, ‘Rorschach’, which is a psychological test used to test a person’s potentially underlying thought disorders, used in mental health facilities. So without going into too much detail, ‘Rorschach’ tells the story of a person trying to escape his/her problems, and then it builds from there.”

Post to Twitter

Huntress Guitarist Blake Meahl Comments On Breakup Rumors

Last night Huntress front woman Jill Janus posted a status update about her frustration with health issues and online trolls, leading several sites to prematurely report that Huntress had broken up. Guitarist Blake Meahl has now issued the following statement clarifying the situation:

“Our vocalist Jill Janus posted an announcement last night that she was having difficulty dealing with devastating health issues. Four months ago she had major surgery to remove cancer from her uterus.

“She needs time to fully recover from her hysterectomy and to continue treatment for her mental health issues. Her bouts with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and disassociative identity disorder have been particularly difficult lately and are ultimately responsible for her unfounded statement last night.

“We will resume touring in December when Huntress joins Black Label Society 12/26-12/31. Thank you for your kindness and understanding.”

Jill Janus recently discussed her physical and mental health issues at length with Revolver, with excerpts from that interview available here.

Post to Twitter

Ex-After The Burial Guitarist Justin Lowe Passes Away

Late last month After The Burial parted ways with guitarist Justin Lowe after he posted a rambling paranoid rant about the other band members, prompting a statement about Lowe suffering from mental health issues.

After going missing earlier this week, we are saddened to announce that Lowe has passed away and apparently died in a fall. RiverTowns.net reports:

St. Croix County authorities on Wednesday released the identity of the man whose body was found near the St. Croix River. The deceased man was identified as 32-year-old Justin A. Lowe of Vadnais Heights, Minn., according to St. Croix County Chief Deputy Scott Knudson.

Lowe’s body was discovered by a hiker early Tuesday beneath the Arcola High Bridge connecting Minnesota and the town of Somerset. Knudson said Lowe had been reported missing July 18 in Washington County, Minn. Foul play was not suspected, Knudson said, adding that the cause of death was consistent with a fall.

Our condolences to the band members and family of Lowe, and if you’d like to leave a message to the band you can do so at Facebook here.

Post to Twitter

The Black Goat Uprising Releasing Debut Full-Length “Medusa”

The Black Goat Uprising has announced the release of debut full-length “Medusa,” a collection of ten song songs that the band describes as “heavy, raw, dark ambient” music.

The Black Goat Uprising founder Jimmy Psycho (Psycho Charger/The Jimmy Psycho Experiment) humorously refers to “Medusa” as his personal “Music from The Elder,” much like the Kiss album of the same name, it’s essentially a soundtrack for a horror film that never got made.

The interesting back story behind “Medusa” is that it was chiefly composed while Psycho was working at a locked-down mental health care facility. He comments:

“When working on ‘Medusa’ I drew a great deal from working there. I visualized what the soundtrack to such a place would sound like: an immersion into orchestrated chaos, from which there is no escape from the daily grind of loneliness ,disorientation, rage, and death. Some of sounds that appear on ‘Medusa’ are from actual environmental recordings from the facility. Those screams and voices on this record are real.”

“Medusa” is the first full-length release for the band, coming shortly after their collaboration with horror rockers Psycho Charger on the song “Black Lodge,” a track recorded to benefit the No-Kill Los Angeles Animal Shelter.

“Medusa” is available on The Black Goat Uprising’s website here.

Post to Twitter